The Parson

…some work in progress from the Cazique of Poyais story…

Thomas Clink sat on the deck reading a small pocket bible when Emma, Noemi and Jose walked past him. He had overheard their recent conversation and thought that they might come to him for verification about Parsons Green. They hadn’t though, choosing instead to blindly believe the word of yet another stranger without independently verifying any facts. Served them right, he thought to himself, whatever cane their way.

He continued to sit and take in the information flowing from peoples lips all around him as he wallowed in a shallow pool of his on self pity and misery. There was no question in his mind that he had been swindled, he just didn’t believe as many others did, that it was McGregor’s fault. That he was shouted down by that Emma woman who now fraternised with the Belizean twins grated at him and added to his misery. One of the sailors noted that they were getting into the Thames estuary so Thomas decided it may just be time to drag someone else into the misery with him.

Slowly, he rose and dusted himself off and then scanned the deck for Emma, Noemi and Jose. He spotted them in good spirits looking at the waters and the land which had so long alluded them in their long trip. Without haste he made his way towards them.

Not without expectation, Emma recoiled slightly when Thomas approached. Noemi and Jose gave a polite nod and said in unison, “Good day, Sir.”

“Indeed it is,” said Thomas, “nice to see the end in sight. I must beg your pardon for interrupting you. I don’t mean to offend your companion again. We have different views and should leave it at that. Too many people have died on this voyage and in Poyais to trifle too much over blame.”

“Someone should be held account,” responded Emma before anyone else could get a word in, “yet I agree that it does very little to attempt to place blame against various different ghosts. There also isn’t any true justice in it anyway as the lives of those lost can’t be restored, whoever is to blame.”

“Very true,” said Thomas, “very well put.”

“I don’t mean to rush you along, but I wondered if there was anything in particular we can do for you Mr. Clink?” asked Jose.

A smile appeared on his otherwise miserable face that seemed overcome by a lifetime’s worth of the exertions of gravity, as he responded, “no, nothing at all. I only cane to settle the score. First with Miss Emma here and then with you two.”

“With us?”

“Yes.”

“But we had no quarrel,” said Noemi, “what could you possibly settle with us?”

“Oh, it was just some very key facts that I left out of our earlier discussion regarding the Parson.”

Blank looks around as they all tried to work out where the old man could possibly be headed with this.

“I felt it my duty to inform you before you land in London that I do in fact know the Parson and I know about the land that the church has there. You see, they control the whole lot,” he said with a little flourish and a grin.

Noemi knew instantly. Emma did as well. As ever Jose lingered.

“And how does that settle a score with us?”

“He’s saying that the land we think we own can’t possibly be transferred to us! It’s all owned by the church.”

“Indeed. You have been swindled just as we were by those mongrel agents of MacGregor and the bankers. Whatever piece of paper you have is, I can most certainly assure you, absolutely fake and not worth a penny. In fact, it could even land you in quite a bit of trouble.”

“You’re lying,” was Jose’s gut reaction, “you’re lying to wind us up.”

“A bit far fetched to assume I’d lie. I only omitted facts before. I can assure you it’s the truth. Check if you like but friendly advice,” he laughed, “keep those documents in your pocket around those parts.”

Stunned again. Could it really be? Jose couldn’t believe it when they were so close.

As Thomas Clink walked off, his mischievous managed, he turned and said, “welcome to London children,” and gave them all a chuckle as he wandered to another part of the ship.

The mood amongst the three darkened. At least they had the flat in the docklands.

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